Friday, November 18, 2016

GUEST POST BY FRANKIE BOW


ABOUT THE BOOK

Professor Molly Barda is thrilled to be included in a grant to investigate attitudes toward biotechnology. But she immediately finds herself embroiled in the deadly fight between big biotech and anti-GMO activists. When Molly and her best friend Emma Nakamura stumble onto the scene of a brutal murder, they realize that everyone has something to hide–and there are some questions you don’t ask.

The Professor Molly mysteries are the first campus murder mysteries set in Hawaii.





GUEST POST BY FRANKIE BOW


The most dangerous animal is not what you think


As a mystery author, I’m always on the lookout for death and danger, and the animal kingdom is a great place to find both. Nature, Tennyson reminds us, is “red in tooth and claw,” and a quick perusal of the Netflix catalog confirms that ferocious animals continue to capture our imagination. Sharks (Jaws), dogs (Cujo), giant snakes (Anaconda), birds (The Birds), bears (Grizzly), rats (Willard), even cockroaches (that episode of Creepshow . . . *shudder*).


But when it comes to human fatalities, none of these creatures holds a candle to deer.
That’s right, deer.


In the United States, deer rack up (ha!) 120 human deaths a year, on average. Bears, alligators and sharks murder a paltry one human per year, and rattlesnakes, those slackers, are responsible for 0.23 annual deaths.

So where’s the scary deer movie? Aside from this one scene from The Ring Two, there doesn’t seem to be anything.

Maybe it’s because deer don’t look that fierce.

Also, they aren’t really out to get us; we’ve expanded into their habitat, and most of the fatalities result from humans in cars running into them. The deer, it must be said, don’t benefit from these encounters any more than we humans do.

So would I consider a death-by-deer plotline? Sure.

It could even be seasonally appropriate.

Like Molly Barda, Frankie Bow teaches at a public university. Unlike her protagonist, she is blessed with delightful students, sane colleagues, and a perfectly nice office chair.

She believes if life isn’t fair, at least it can be entertaining.


In addition to writing murder mysteries, she publishes in scholarly journals under her real name. Her experience with academic publishing has taught her to take nothing personally.








ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Like Molly Barda, Frankie Bow teaches at a public university. Unlike her protagonist, she is blessed with delightful students, sane colleagues, a loving family, and a perfectly nice office chair. She believes if life isn’t fair, at least it can be entertaining.

In addition to writing murder mysteries, she publishes in scholarly journals under her real name. Her experience with academic publishing has taught her to take nothing personally.

Connect with Frankie:
Webpage  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Goodreads  |  LinkedIn 

Amazon  |  Barnes & Noble


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